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Bail! Do something else with your skills?

So many of my therapy friends are jumping ship!


Unless you are or know someone in the rehabilitation profession or work adjacent to it, you may not know that in the last year there have been a tremendous amount of highly-skilled, therapy professionals who are leaving the field. From reimbursement cutbacks to pay cuts, more rules to too many new graduates flooding the market, to pandemic exhaustion: the reasons are many.

Therapists and therapist assistants are opening their own businesses, modifying the homes of the elderly, going to work for insurance agencies, becoming nurses, opening daycares and doing telehealth! Some are staying - and we desperately need some to stay.


But if you know me, you may know that it's been years in the making. Healthcare doesn't feel like care, or caring sometimes. Yes, profit has always been a factor, money has to come in to pay the salaries and the utilities -- but is has gone too far lately. See more patients, be paid less, layoffs and rehires with different pay, risk pandemic hazard without hazard pay or overtime pay ... not be appreciated? I have heard and read a lot of scenarios and it makes me sad.


A HUGE reason we are leaving seems to be an emotional one, involving the heart. Times change, yes -- but a lot of us are leaving the profession because it is important to us to have heart.


We're smart, analytical people. That's what they pay us for: how fast can we assess something, analyze it, make a plan, fix it, document it all? By the way, do it in 60 minutes or less, please. But there is only so much your soul can take. (That goes for a lot of industries and jobs, right?)

I once worked in an orthopedic clinic owned by 2 surgeons. Everything seemed great: I was the director, I could put new policies in place, I could hire some staff. (Still not sure why this hadn't already been done?) I could make a difference in people's lives, their pain, their disability; I could help them return to being ABLE and quality of life returns to "prior level of function" ...